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Training and Curriculum

It's Not For Everyone - Just the Leaders of Tomorrow

The specific education you receive in Army ROTC will include things like leadership development, military skills and adventure training. This will take place both in the classroom and in the field, but you will have a normal daily schedule like all college students. Army ROTC is comprised of two phases: Basic Course and Advanced Course.

Curriculum

The curriculum normally consists of two-year Basic Course (freshmen/sophomores) and a two-year Advanced Course (juniors/seniors). Some modification to this curriculum is common, as with graduate or transfer students. Completing the 30-day Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) at Fort Knox, Kentucky is equivalent to completing the Basic Course. Successful graduates of CIET are normally offered ROTC scholarships and an opportunity to enroll in the Advanced Course. High school Junior ROTC experience, prior military service, and military academy attendance may also qualify for Basic Course completion.
All Advanced Course students are cadets and have a contractual agreement with the Army. These students attend the Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) at Fort Knox, KY between their junior and senior level courses. This is a core requirement to commission in the Army.  
Army ROTC strives to develop values-based graduates that offer expert leadership to the campus, the community, and the Army. As such, we offer and encourage cadets to participate in: paid leadership and technical internships; cultural and language immersion programs; a number of Army military school opportunities in Europe, South America, the Republic of Korea, Alaska, Hawaii, and across the continental United States.

Extracurricular actives may also include community assistance, Red Cross blood drives, tutoring for at-risk children, volunteering at the Veterans' Administration and more. Cadets may apply for additional military training such as skydiving, helicopter rappelling, mountaineering, and cold weather training. New and challenging opportunities routinely become available.

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Military Science - Army ROTC 

Stevenson University offers the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) in conjunction with The Johns Hopkins University's Blue Jay Battalion. The JHU Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) was among the first to be established by Congress in 1916 and is routinely ranked at the top of the nation's 273 programs. More than 3,000 students have received Army officer commissions through the program, with over 40 attaining the rank of general officer. Students can enter the program with as little as two years remaining as an undergraduate or may complete the requirements while pursuing a graduate degree. Upon graduation students are commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Some are selected to attend a funded law school or several medical programs, while others serve in the active Army, the Army Reserve, or the Army National Guard. ROTC basic classes are open to all students: The leadership and management class specializes in leader development and is an excellent course for students aspiring to become leaders on campus and beyond. Additional information on military science or ROTC can be obtained by asking a current cadet, and by calling 1-800-JHU-ROTC or 410-516-4686. Additional information can be obtained by emailing rotc@jhu.edu or visiting the JHU ROTC website (http://www.jhurotc.com).

Scholarship and Financial Assistance

Army ROTC offers four, three, and two-year scholarships that pay full tuition (or room and board), $1,200 for books and a $300 - 500 monthly stipend.  Additional incentives include a monthly language stipend ($100 - 250), a study abroad program ($6,000), special incentives for nurses, and postgraduate programs for medical and law degrees.

Applications for scholarships by qualified students are awarded throughout the semester. A non-scholarship program is also available. For health professions and nursing students, ROTC can offer numerous opportunities to achieve specialized education and additional postgraduate scholarships.

Classes

374.101
Introduction to the Army
2 credits
Offered at JHU

The MSL I course produces a Cadet who accepts the Army as a values-based organization and embraces the scholar-athlete-warrior ethos; who is familiar with individual roles and responsibilities in support of team efforts and problem solving processes in military and non-military situations; who demonstrates oral and written communication skills, understands resilience, and demonstrates a commitment to learning.

MSL101 introduces Cadets to the Army and the Profession of Arms. Students will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army. The overall focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of the Army Leadership Requirements Model while gaining a big picture understanding of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.   Cadets also learn how resiliency and fitness supports their development as an Army leader.

As you become further acquainted with MSL101, you will learn the structure of the ROTC Basic Course program consisting of MSL101, 102, 201, 202, Fall and Spring Leadership Labs, and Basic Camp.

The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions, attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.

Co-requisite(s): 374.110 for ROTC students; none for non-ROTC students.

374.102
Foundations of Agile and Adaptive Leadership
2 credits
Offered at JHU

The MSL I course produces a Cadet who accepts the Army as a values-based organization and embraces the scholar-athlete-warrior ethos; who is familiar with individual roles and responsibilities in support of team efforts and problem solving processes in military and non-military situations; who demonstrates oral and written communication skills, understands resilience, and demonstrates a commitment to learning.

MSL102 introduces Cadets to the Army and the Profession of Arms. Students will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army. The overall focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of the Army Leadership Requirements Model while gaining a big picture understanding of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.   Cadets also learn how resiliency and fitness supports their development as an Army leader.

As you become further acquainted with MSL102, you will learn the structure of the ROTC Basic Course program consisting of MSL101, 102, 201, 202, Fall and Spring Leadership Labs, and Basic Camp.

The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions, attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.

Co-requisite(s): 374.120 for ROTC students; none for non-ROTC students.

374.110-120
Basic Leadership Laboratory I, II
1 credit
Offered at JHU

Exposes students in a laboratory environment to practical experiences, challenges and individual learning opportunities in a small group. Students learn the fundamentals of an organization and apply principles of leadership and management at the foundation level. Students develop military courtesy, organizational discipline, communication and basic leadership and management skills. Ultimately, students understand how to facilitate and lead a small group of four to five people as an integral part of a larger organization of 75-100 people through situational training opportunities in a variety of conditions. As a leadership practicum, students have the opportunity to serve in leadership positions and receive tactical and technical training. In addition to learning to lead groups of five to 100 people, students will also be exposed to training on first aid, operating Army equipment, Army activities such as rappelling and drill and ceremony. These laboratories are required for enrolled ROTC participants who desire to be considered for a commission in the Army.

Co-requisite(s): 374.101-102

374.201
Leadership and Decision Making
2 credits
Offered at JHU

 

The MSL II course produces a cadet grounded in foundational leadership doctrine and skills by following and leading small units to achieve assigned missions; who applies critical thinking and problem solving using Troop Leading Procedures (TLP); who comprehends the value of diversity  and understands the officer‘s role in leading change; understands the fundamentals of the Army as a profession.

MSL201 adds depth to the Cadets understanding of the Adaptability Army Learning Area.  The outcomes are demonstrated through Critical and Creative Thinking and the ability to apply Troop Leading Procedures (TLP) to apply Innovative Solutions to Problems.  The Army Profession is also stressed through leadership forums and a leadership self-assessment.  Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during Leadership LABs team building exercises, and Field Training Exercises.

Co-requisite(s): 374.210 for ROTC students; none for non-ROTC students.

374.202 Army Doctrine and Team Development 2 credits, Offered at JHU

 

MSL 202 focuses on Army doctrine and team development. The course begins the journey to understand and demonstrate competencies as they relate to Army doctrine. Army Values, Teamwork, and Warrior Ethos and their relationship to the Law of Land Warfare and philosophy of military service are also stressed.

The ability to lead and follow is also covered through Team Building exercises in small units up to squad level. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during Leadership LABs (team building exercises, LTXs, VBS exercises). Includes a 1-Hour lab per week taught by MS III Cadets.

The Army Reserve Officer Training Course (ROTC) Basic Course is an academically rigorous 2-year college program comprised of four semester courses of instruction, Leadership Labs (two sets, Fall/Spring), and the Cadet Basic Camp conducted at Fort Knox, KY.

Co-requisite(s): 374.220 for ROTC students; none for non-ROTC students

374.210
Basic Team Leadership Laboratory
1 credit
Offered at JHU

Provides training in leading and assisting 4-5 person teams through a variety of training opportunities. Students learn the troop-leading procedures, basic problem solving, and tactical skills aimed at military leadership and will mentor and assist members of their team with improving their own skills and leadership as well.

Co-requisite(s): 374.201

374.220
Intermediate Team Leadership Laboratory
1 credit
Offered at JHU

 

Develops student leadership, as team leaders of 4-5 other students, during a variety of induced training opportunities. They also begin to lead larger groups, from 9 to 60 people, in a variety of situations designed to challenge emerging leaders. Continued emphasis is placed on troop-leading-procedures and problem solving. Students lead physical fitness training and mentor subordinates in military, academic and extra-curricular activities. Successful completion of this course allows students to progress into ROTC Advanced Courses.

Co-requisite(s): 374.202

374.301
Training Management and the Warfighting Functions
2 credits
Offered at JHU

MSL301 Training Management and the Warfighting Functions, is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army Leadership, Officership, Army Values and Ethics, Personal Development, and small unit tactics at the platoon level.  At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a squad and platoon in the execution of a mission during a classroom PE, a Leadership Lab, or during a Field Training Exercise (FTX).  You will be required to write peer evaluations and receive feedback on your abilities as a leader and how to improve those leader skills that can further develop you in to a successful officer.  This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, and practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and a final exam.  You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes, values, and core leader competencies from your instructor, other ROTC cadre, and MSL IV Cadets who will evaluate you using the Cadet Officer Evaluation System (COER).  Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for the SROTC Advanced Camp, which you will attend in the summer at Fort Knox, KY.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Course completion Co-requisite(s): 374.310.

374.302
Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations

2 credits
Offered at JHU

MSL302 Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations, is an academically challenging course were you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army Leadership, Army Values and Ethics, Personal Development, and small unit tactics at the platoon level.  At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a squad and platoon in the execution of a mission during a classroom PE, a Leadership Lab, or during a Field Training Exercise (FTX).  You will be required to write peer evaluations and receive feedback on your abilities as a leader and how to improve those leader skills that can further develop you in to a successful officer.  This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, and practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and a final exam.  You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes, values, and core leader competencies from your instructor, other ROTC cadre, and MSL IV Cadets who will evaluate you using the Cadet Officer Evaluation Report (COER).  Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for the SROTC Advanced Camp, which you will attend in the summer at Fort Knox, KY.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Course and 374.301 Co-requisite(s): 374.320

374.307
Leadership in Military History
2 credits
Offered at JHU

Provides students with a historical perspective to decisions made by American military leaders: battlefield complexity, resource limitations, and teamwork deficiencies. Students cover major military engagements from the colonial period through the current operating environment. Students examine how leaders motivated their men, devised battle strategies, implemented rules of engagement, and managed supplies, transportation, and logistics for their troops.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Director of Military Science

374.310
Basic Tactical Leadership Laboratory
1 credit
Offered at JHU

Applies what students have learned in the classroom, in a tactical or field environment. Students learn and demonstrate the fundamentals of leadership by planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating, and leading squads in the execution of both garrison and tactical missions. Students are evaluated as part of the Leadership Development Program and FM 6-22, Army Leadership. Ultimately, prepares students to excel at the four-week Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) at Fort Knox, KY.

Co-requisite(s): 374.301

374.320
Intermediate Tactical Leadership Laboratory
1 credit
Offered at JHU

Builds on the first semester’s achievements as students further develop their leadership skills by planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating, and leading squads in the execution of both garrison and tactical missions. Students are evaluated as part of the Leadership Development Program and FM 6-22, Army Leadership. Ultimately, prepares students to excel at the four-week Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) at Fort Knox, KY.

Co-requisite(s): 374.302

374.401
The Army Officer
2 credits
Offered at JHU

MSL 401 Focuses on development of the Army Officer. It is an academically challenging course were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities to plan, resource, and assess training at the small unit level. You will also learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities. At the conclusion of this course, you will be familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute, and continuously assess the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level. Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre.

Prerequisite(s): 374.301-302, 310-320 and the Basic Course Co-requisite(s): 374.410

374.402 Company Grade Leadership
2 credits,
Offered at JHU

This is an academically challenging course were you will study, practice, develop, and apply critical thinking skills pertaining to Army leadership, officer skills, Army Values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at platoon level.  This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, practical exercises, mid-term exam, and a Capstone Exercise in place of the final exam.  For the Capstone Exercise, you will be required to complete an Oral Practicum that you will be evaluated on your knowledge of the 20 Army Warfighting Challenges (AWFC) covered throughout MSL401 and 402 coursework. In addition, you could be assessed on leadership abilities during classroom PE, Leadership Labs, or during a Field Training Exercise (FTX).  You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes, values, and core leader competencies from your cadre, PMS and other MSL IV Cadets who will evaluate you using the Cadet Officer Evaluation Report (COER).  You will be required to write peer evaluations and receive feedback on your abilities as a leader and how to improve those leader skills. At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to plan, coordinate, navigate, motivate and lead a platoon in future operational environments.  Successful completion of this course will assist in preparing you for your BOLC B course and is a mandatory requirement for commissioning.

Prerequisite(s): 374.301-302, 310-320, 374.401 and Basic Course Co-requisite(s): 374.420 

374.407
Being a Platoon Leader
1 credit
Offered at JHU

Prepares cadets for actual challenges not necessarily described in text books that junior officers may face in today’s Army. Topics include: serving during war, conflict management, ethical dilemmas, time-constrained planning, and change management. This course also serves as pre-requisite for the Basic Officer Leadership Course “B” phase by providing students with reinforced development on: deployment preparation, the military style of writing, supply management, human resources management, family support and operations management. Students will also learn how the Army’s organizational structure and administration affects soldiers across ranks and over time. Finally, students will learn ways to leverage automation to improve their efficiency and effectiveness of records management and developing presentations for superiors.

374.410-420
Advanced Planning and Decision Making Laboratory I, II
1 credit,
Offered at JHU

Develops a semester-long progression of programmed training activates that support completion of the unit’s Mission Essential Task List. The laboratory builds from fall to spring semester as students master advanced problem solving, resource synchronization and executive decision making. Students evaluate, mentor and develop subordinate leaders as part of the Leadership Development Program and FM 6-22, Army Leadership. The course serves as the final evaluation and determination on a student’s ability to lead Soldier’s as a Second Lieutenant in the US Army.

Prerequisite(s): 374.301-302, 310-320 and Basic Course Co-requisite(s): 374.401-402

374.501-502
Independent Study
1-2 credits
Offered at JHU

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the director of military science

374.505-506
Leadership Internship
1-2 credits,
Offered at JHU

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the director of military science

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Summer Training

Cadet Troop Leadership Training

Cadet Troop Leadership Training (CTLT) is designed as a "follow-on" training experience for ROTC Advanced Camp graduates. CTLT offers the MS III cadet the opportunity to perform the duties of a Second Lieutenant for up to one month with an active duty unit in the continental United States or overseas.   Actual duties performed will vary by branch and unit but will generally be those duties expected of a Second Lieutenant in that unit.  Many cadets will serve as either platoon leaders or assistant platoon leaders.  This is a great opportunity and should be sought by all eligible cadets.  Cadets receive pay and allowance equal to 1/2 that of a second lieutenant.  Must be an Advanced Camp graduate and not participating in the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP).

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Nurse Summer Training Program

The NSTP is a three-week clinical elective for Army ROTC nurse cadets. Attendance is voluntary. This paid elective is conducted at Army hospitals in the United States, Germany and Korea. You attend NSTP during the summer with Advanced Camp, which is usually attended between the Junior and Senior year of college. During the NSTP clinical elective, you will receive "hands on" experience under the direct supervision of a preceptor -- an Army Nurse Corps officer who works with you one-on-one. While you follow the same duty schedule as your preceptor, you could receive training in such areas as patient assessment, planning of patient care, nutrition maintenance and feeding techniques, range of motion and mobility, medication administration, emergency procedures, intravenous (IV) therapy, and other special techniques.  Partnership in Nursing Education Programs award academic credit for this program. And by the end of the summer, NSTP will have shown you a preview of the real world of nursing, developed your professional skills and given you valuable insights into your abilities. NSTP provides nursing students an opportunity to practice leadership and clinical skills between their junior and senior year of college.

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Leader Development and Assessment Course (Warrior Forge)

Warrior Forge is the most important training event for an Army ROTC cadet or National Guard Officer Candidate. The 32-day camp incorporates a wide range of subjects designed to develop and evaluate leadership ability. The challenges are rigorous and demanding, both mentally and physically. Advanced Camp tests intelligence, common sense, ingenuity and stamina. These challenges provide a new perspective on an individual's ability to perform exacting tasks and to make difficult decisions in demanding situations

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Leadership Training Course

The Leader's Training Course is the Army�s 2-year ROTC Program entry point. Through the Leader's Training Course, students without ROTC Basic Course experience can examine the Army without incurring an obligation, and qualify for Advanced Course entry. The Army observes these students and determines their officer potential in a leadership oriented, challenging, and motivating 5-week training program at Fort Knox, Kentucky.  LTC is an exciting way to experience the ARMY. It is also a key step in the process of earning a commission as an Officer in the U.S. Army during the next two years on campus.  Great opportunity to learn more about leadership, people, and most important, YOURSELF!

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Mountain Warfare

At the Mountain Warfare School you will learn how to survive in the worst imaginable arctic conditions. You will learn the art of maneuver and conducting military missions in extreme cold over rugged terrain. This is a course for only the toughest - climbing that ice covered rock face in sub zero temperatures is not for everyone. Are you up to the challenge? Mountain Warfare School is a two-week course conducted at the Ethan Allen Firing Range at Jericho, VT. Both a summer and a winter phase are offered. Its mission is to develop and conduct resident mountain warfare training under both summer and winter conditions. The mountain warfare course develops the leadership and technical skills of Army personnel by requiring them to perform mountaineering tasks in a realistic tactical mountain environment. It provides the student with the practical hands-on experience in the application of tactics and techniques needed for mountain operations. A cadet obtains a slot in Mountain Warfare School by virtue of his/her performance during the school year.

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Airborne School

Do you think you have what it takes to step up to the door of an aircraft, look down at the drop zone, jump 1,000 feet and land safely--ready to fight? It takes a special kind of person to volunteer for this assignment - someone with an unflinching spirit for adventure. If you're that kind of person, the sky's the limit in Airborne.  Airborne School is a three-week school conducted at Fort Benning, GA and is the most popular of all the special training courses offered. Instruction is broken down into three one-week phases, Ground Week, Tower Week, and Jump Week, and encompasses all aspects of jumping. In Jump Week, the student makes five parachute jumps at 1250 feet from a C-130 or C-141 airplane. A cadet obtains a slot in Airborne School by virtue of his/her performance during the school year.

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Air Assault

Air Assault School is a two-week school conducted at various posts across the country. Instruction is centered around the combat assault from helicopters. The school is broken into three phases. The first covers conducting air assault operations; the second covers slingloading equipment to helicopters; and the third instructs the student on all aspects of rappelling. The school is physically demanding, and the student is required to conduct two road marches within specified time blocks. Successful completion of this school qualifies the cadet to wear the Air Assault Badge.

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Robin Sage Internship Program

Robin Sage Internship Program is for MS III cadets only. To qualify for this internship, the cadet must have an interest in Infantry and/or Special Forces and submit a Robin Sage Internship application with a copy of the cadet's complete historical APFT card reflecting an APFT results within the last 90 days. MSIII Cadets fill leader positions within "G" bands. There are 15 "G" bands consisting of three to four cadets, 15-20 regular Army personnel and one "G" Chief. The "G" band conducts link-up operations with Special Forces Student Operational Detachment Alphas, receives specific training and conduct combat and sustainment operations. This program provides the cadets with opportunities to learn and grow as potential leaders. Areas to which cadets are exposed: Troop Leading Procedures, Mission Planning (Warning, Patrol and Frag orders), Small Unit Tactic (Raids, Ambushes, Recons), Air Operations (Drop and Landing Zones and Message pick-up), Basic Field Craft (Survival, Expedient Navigation), Demolition, Medical, Communications and Weapons. The location for this internship is in the area of Asheboro and Albemarle, NC and Camp Mackall, NC.

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Northern Warfare School

The Northern Warfare Training Center is located in Ft. Greely, Alaska. The course is three weeks long with emphasis on mobility in mountainous terrain, glaciers, and inland waterways.  Mountain phase includes climbing, rappelling, and medical evacuation. The River phase covers boat operations, stream crossing, and river charting, reading and navigation. The Glacier phase covers crevasse rescue, step cutting and anchors, and belaying and party climbing. A cadet obtains a slot in Northern Warfare School by virtue of his/her performance during the school year.

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Schools

JHU Logo The Johns Hopkins University
UMBC Logo University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)
UMB Logo University of Maryland, Baltimore
SU Logo Stevenson University
UB Logo University of Baltimore
MICA Logo Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA)
JHU School of Nursing Logo JHU School of Nursing
Asymmetric Studies Institute Partnership Program
Asymmetric Studies Institute
 

Questions or Comments?

If you have any questions or comments about the Blue Jay Battalion, please let us know.

Dept. of Military Science
3400 North Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
410-516-4686
CPT Kirkland (JKirkla8@jhu.edu)